Monthly Archives: June 2014

Creating a Metacognitive Movement for Faculty

by Charity Peak, U.S. Air Force Academy* Faculty often complain that students don’t complete reading assignments.  When students do read, faculty yearn for deeper analysis but can’t seem to get it.  With SAT reading scores reaching a four-decade low (Layton & Brown, 2012) and nearly forty percent of postsecondary learners taking remedial coursework (Bettinger & Long, 2009), it’s not surprising… Read more »

Are College Students Picky About Using Metacognitive Reading Strategies?

 by Roman Taraban, Texas Tech University “Picky, picky” is a phrase we use to gently chide someone for being overly selective when making an apparently simple choice.  However, being picky is not always a bad thing, as I will try to show. Oddly enough, this phrase comes to mind when thinking about thinking about thinking, i.e., thinking about metacognition.  To… Read more »

Webinar Slides: From ‘Student’ to ‘Informed Consumer’ of Learning

by Ed Nuhfer and Karl Wirth http://www.calstate.edu/itl/documents/ITLFeb72014EN_KW_final.pdf This very informative and useful set of webinar slides (supported by the CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning) starts with a discussion of metadisciplines, pointing out that “A realization that arises from becoming educated: every metadiscipline offers a valuable way of knowing.” Following that, the presenters discuss three types of learning (knowing, skills and reasoning), and assert that “Ideally, a curricula should help students become mindful of how to distinguish the three and how to learn all three effectively.” They present data showing that most courses in… Read more »