Monthly Archives: April 2016

Does Processing Fluency Really Matter for Metacognition in Actual Learning Situations? (Part Two)

In a previous post, Michael Serra considered the role of processing fluency within lab setting and found that ease of processing leads to learners overestimating how much they know. While this could potentially have implications for actual classroom environments, Serra concludes that “it seems that perceptual fluency is not a problem we should be greatly concerned about in realistic learning situations.”

Part One: Does Processing Fluency Really Matter for Metacognition in Actual Learning Situations?

In part one of a two part series, Michael Serra explores the relationship between processing fluency (e.g., easy to read large print text) and learning complex material. At least in the lab, “learners are often misled by feelings of fluency or disfluency that are neither related to their level of learning nor predictive of their future test performance.” Part two will consider the implications for classroom environments.

Unskilled and Unaware: A Metacognitive Bias

In this post, John R. Schumacher, Eevin Akers, and Roman Taraban observe that while note taking improves test performance, it does not improve calibration. They argue that students “need to be aware that waiting a short time before judging whether they need more study will result in more effective self-regulation of study time.”