Monthly Archives: May 2016

Distributed Metacognition: Insights from Machine Learning and Human Distraction

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In this post, Dr. Philip Beaman draws a parallel between different types of machine learning (supervised and unsupervised) and human metacognitive processes, with some evidence that “that meta-cognition under distraction benefits from distributing some of the relevant knowledge away from the head and into the world.”

Learning to Write and Writing to Learn: The Intersection of Rhetoric and Metacognition

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In this post, Dr. Amy Ratto Parks proposes a Meta-Rhetorical Triangle as a way to to support students’ successful navigation of writing assignments across the disciplines, and as a way to help instructors “offer the kinds of assignment details students really need in order to succeed in our classes.”