Monthly Archives: July 2016

Hitting the Metacognitive Target with Learning Objectives

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In this post, Guy Boysen warns that us not to “let your students lob random intellectual darts at mysterious learning targets. Be a model teacher by providing them with clear learning objectives and feedback on their success so that they can hone their metacognitive skills!”

Hypercorrection: Overcoming overconfidence with metacognition

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In this post, Jason Lodge argues that metacognition can help support student confidence while also helping to correct for overconfidence. He concludes, “it is vital that students develop metacognition so that they can monitor when they are wrong or when they are not progressing as they should be. If they can, then there is every chance that the learning experience can be more powerful as a result.”

When & Where to Teach Metacognitive Skills to College Students

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Aaron S. Richmond, Ph.D. Metropolitan State University of Denver In past blogs, I’ve written about topics that focus on the relationship between academic procrastination and metacognition (Richmond, 2016), or different instructional methods to increase your student’s metacognition (Richmond 2015a, 2015b), or even how to use metacognitive theory to improve teaching practices (Richmond, 2014). However, during my morning coffee the other… Read more »

Don’t “Just Do It” – Think First

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In this post Dr. Roman Taraban explores some reasons why students might not engage in metacognitive problem solving, and suggests ways by which instructors might promote deeper learning by explicitly sharing their own metacognitive decision-making processes.