Category Archives: Blog

Introducing Metacognition to Students

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In this post, Dr. Hillary Steiner shares why it’s important to thoughtfully introduce students to metacognition so that they are more likely to actually implement metacognitive practices. She includes a great primer / handout for students that explains how (and why!) to become a metacognitive college student.

It shouldn’t be Top Secret – Bloom’s Taxonomy

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Dr. Lauren Scharff argues that instructors should more often and more explicitly share Bloom’s taxonomy, and perhaps even more importantly, share how it can be applied by students to raise their awareness of learning expectations for different assignments and guide their choice of learning strategies. A handout is provided that walks students through a series of questions that help them apply Bloom’s as a guide for their learning and academic efforts.

Contemplating Contemplative Pedagogy

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In this post, Dr. Alison Staudinger shares her reflections and struggles with the questions, Does contemplation belong in the academic classroom? If yes, then how might instructors appropriately and effectively bring the benefits of contemplation and mindfulness into the classroom in order to support learning?

Developing Affective Abilities through Metacognition Part 2: Going Granular

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In this post, Dr. Ed Nuhfer introduces the importance of global and granular forms of thinking before reporting evidence that metacognitive awareness of granular forms of understanding can be more effective in developing understanding of content. The distinction between global and granular forms of understanding can also aid in understanding more affective forms of knowing.

Tackling your “Laundry” List through Metacognitive Goal Setting

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In this post Dr. Tara Beziat shares her realization that many students approach academic goals as she had been approaching her never-ending chore of “finishing the laundry.” By using effective goal setting techniques combined with metacognition, both academic and daily living goals can be more effectively accomplished.

Developing Affective Abilities through Metacognition: Part 1

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In this post, Dr. Ed Nuhfer explores proposes a link between metacognition and development in the affective domain. He discusses theories of development by Benjamin Bloom and William Perry, and suggests that we are finally in a time period when affect and metacognition are being recognized as legitimate aspects of an educated person.

Metacognitive links connecting the Arts and STEM

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In the post, an actor (Pierce) and biologist (Santangelo) offer a snapshot of their ongoing dialogue over the role of metacognition in their respective disciplines. The emerging conversation offers insight into how professors can support student learning in STEAM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics).

Hate-Inspired Webforums, PTSD, and Metacognition

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In this post, Roman Taraban offers a way of “increasing our understanding of metacognitive processing by beginning to implement some of the technology that has already been extensively applied to hate-inspired webforums and trauma-related therapies.” In particular, he argues for the development of a metacognitive register (or specialized vocabulary) that can serve as an analytical tool to improve classroom performance.

The Mutual Benefits of Metacognition for Faculty and Students

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In this post, Dr. Marc Napolitano recounts a recent discussion with faculty about end-of-term reflections. He notes how cultivating a sense of metacognition in one’s self and in one’s students can promote a mutually beneficial educational experience over the course of a semester or school year.

Keep Calm and Improve with Metacognition: reflecting on three years of reflecting

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In this post, John Draeger reflects on his involvement with Improve with Metacognition (IwM) over the last three years. He describes several ways that the site has helped improve his self-awareness and self-regulation. Consequently, he has noticed improvements in his life as a teacher, a writer, and a scholar.

What I Learned About Metacognition from Cooking Farro

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In this post, Dr. Stephen Chew draws an analogy from his experience cooking farro for the first time and students’ ability to effectively use metacognition. Both require that the person making the effort has a clear end goal in mind, so that current status can be compared with the end goal, and effective adjustments made to correct his or her actions toward that goal.

Joining Forces: The Potential Effects of Team-Based Learning and Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique on Metacognition

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by Aaron S. Richmond, Ph. D., Metropolitan State University of Denver As a standalone assessment tool, the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) has been demonstrated to affect student learning and students’ perceptions of the teacher (e.g., Brosvic et al. 2006; Slepkov & Sheil, 2014) and possibly improve metacognition (see Richmond, 2017). However, can IF-AT be combined with a cooperative learning activity… Read more »

Does a Machine Have Metacognition?

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In this post, Dr. Roman Taraban explores the question, “Although we are inclined to attribute metacognition to bright individuals, … can we dismiss the possibility that metacognition can exist in “dumb” machines – dumb in the sense that they do not have human-like understanding?”

Collateral Metacognitive Damage

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In this post Dr. Ed Nuhfer discusses the odds that those we are tempted to label as “unskilled and unaware of it” is likely to be correct. Although “the consensus in the literature of psychology seems to indicate that they are, our investigation of the numeracy underlying the consensus indicates otherwise (Nuhfer and others, 2017).” Dr. Nuhfer shares highlights of their findings, discusses further dangers of holding an oversimplified, negative pre-assessment of others, and includes a link to a site where you can explore their self-assessment instrument.