Category Archives: Blog

Scratch and Win or Scratch and Lose? Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique

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By Aaron S. Richmond, Ph. D., Metropolitan State University of Denver When prepping my courses for this spring semester, I was thinking about how I often struggle with providing quick and easy feedback on quiz and exam performance to my students. I expressed this to my colleague, Dr. Anna Ropp (@AnnaRopp), and she quickly suggested that I check out Immediate… Read more »

Collateral Metacognitive Damage

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In this post Dr. Ed Nuhfer discusses the odds that those we are tempted to label as “unskilled and unaware of it” is likely to be correct. Although “the consensus in the literature of psychology seems to indicate that they are, our investigation of the numeracy underlying the consensus indicates otherwise (Nuhfer and others, 2017).” Dr. Nuhfer shares highlights of their findings, discusses further dangers of holding an oversimplified, negative pre-assessment of others, and includes a link to a site where you can explore their self-assessment instrument.

Promoting academic rigor with metacognition

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In this post, Dr. John Draeger offers a model of academic rigor to frame discussions about course design, instruction, and assessment. He also argues that “if tools for reflection (e.g., a model of academic rigor) help instructors map out the most salient aspects of a course, then metacognition is the mechanism by which instructors navigate that map. If so, then promoting academic rigor requires metacognition.”

Teacher, Know Thyself (Translation: Use Student Evaluations of Teaching!)

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In this post, Dr. Guy Boysen discusses the metacognitive phenomenon of “being unskilled and unaware,” and how it can sometimes be observed in instructors’ responses (or lack of response) to student evaluations. Dr. Boysen gives several suggestions for instructors about how they can be more metacognitive and put their evaluation feedback to more productive use.

New Year Metacognition

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In this post Dr. Lauren Scharff shares why you should take a metacognitive approach to your new year’s resolutions in order to maximize your likelihood of accomplishing those goals.

Bringing a Small Gift – The Metacognitive Experience

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In this post, Dr. Roman Taraban wishes us glad tidings and a season filled with metacognition. He encourages instructors to be thoughtful about the gifts that each semester brings, including student evaluations. Being metacognitive about student feedback can make the learning experience more meaningful for all concerned.

Can Reciprocal Peer Tutoring Increase Metacognition in Your Students?

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Aaron S. Richmond, Ph. D. How many of you use collaborative learning in your classroom? If you do, do you specifically use it to increase metacognition in your students? If the answer is yes, you are likely building on the work of Hadwin, Jarvela, and Miller (2011) and Schraw, Crippen, and Hartley (2006). For those of you unfamiliar with collaborative… Read more »

Metacogntion: Daring Your Students to Take Responsibility for Their Own Successes and Failures.

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In this post, Harrison Fisher encourages all of us to dare our “students to take responsibility for their own learning by using metacognition to monitor their successes and failures.” He offers a variety of strategies to promote metacognition.

Do Your Questions Invite Metacognition?

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In this post Arthur Costa and Bena Kallick share question prompts that invite metacognitive responses. They suggest that, “If teachers pose questions that deliberately engage students’ cognitive processing, and let students know why the questions are being posed in this way, it is more likely that students will become aware of and engage their own metacognitive processes.”

A Whole New Engineer: A Whole New Challenge

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In this post, Dr. Roman Taraban shares a movement in some engineering colleges to break the stereotype of engineers being geeky, asocial, introverts. The efforts shared in the post promote a more “whole” engineer who is able to reflect on her/his practice and navigate complex environments. Dr. Taraban explores whether or not this reflective approach means that such “whole” engineers are also metacognitive in their practices.

Developing Mindfulness as a Metacognitive Skill

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In this post, Ed Nuhfer explores the role of metacognition and mindfulness in the enhancement of student learning. Both, Nuhfer argues, can help bridge the gap between traditional pedagogies and more student-centered learning experiences.

Using Metacognition to Develop College Faculty

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In this post Dr. Charity Peak shares an “appeal for new faculty to embrace metacognition about their instruction by understanding their developmental path with college teaching.”

Two-in-One: Using Metacognition to Improve Judgment for Citizenship

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In this post, Dr. Alison Staudinger suggests that “Students developing as citizens need habits of mind to help them evaluate the messy and propagandistic political world. Judging politically is a reflective, metacognitive process, not just aimed at political facts, but also values and ethical commitments, and in response to the pluralistic values of others.”

Hitting the Metacognitive Target with Learning Objectives

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In this post, Guy Boysen warns that us not to “let your students lob random intellectual darts at mysterious learning targets. Be a model teacher by providing them with clear learning objectives and feedback on their success so that they can hone their metacognitive skills!”

Hypercorrection: Overcoming overconfidence with metacognition

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In this post, Jason Lodge argues that metacognition can help support student confidence while also helping to correct for overconfidence. He concludes, “it is vital that students develop metacognition so that they can monitor when they are wrong or when they are not progressing as they should be. If they can, then there is every chance that the learning experience can be more powerful as a result.”

When & Where to Teach Metacognitive Skills to College Students

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Aaron S. Richmond, Ph.D. Metropolitan State University of Denver In past blogs, I’ve written about topics that focus on the relationship between academic procrastination and metacognition (Richmond, 2016), or different instructional methods to increase your student’s metacognition (Richmond 2015a, 2015b), or even how to use metacognitive theory to improve teaching practices (Richmond, 2014). However, during my morning coffee the other… Read more »