Tag Archives: teaching metacognition

It shouldn’t be Top Secret – Bloom’s Taxonomy

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Dr. Lauren Scharff argues that instructors should more often and more explicitly share Bloom’s taxonomy, and perhaps even more importantly, share how it can be applied by students to raise their awareness of learning expectations for different assignments and guide their choice of learning strategies. A handout is provided that walks students through a series of questions that help them apply Bloom’s as a guide for their learning and academic efforts.

Hate-Inspired Webforums, PTSD, and Metacognition

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In this post, Roman Taraban offers a way of “increasing our understanding of metacognitive processing by beginning to implement some of the technology that has already been extensively applied to hate-inspired webforums and trauma-related therapies.” In particular, he argues for the development of a metacognitive register (or specialized vocabulary) that can serve as an analytical tool to improve classroom performance.

A Project-Based Method to Help Students Practice Study Strategies in an Authentic Context

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Hillary Steiner shares an assignment that develops time management, communication, and study strategies in the process of preparing for an actual test.

Encouraging Metacognition in the Advanced Physics Lab

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Melissa EblenZayas shares “metacognitive support activities in the form of written reflections and class discussions to help students develop better approaches to dealing with challenges that arise in open-ended experimental work in an advanced lab course in physics.”

Practice with a Reasoning Process to Make Learning Visible and Improve Academic Performance

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Jessica Santangelo shares how she promotes metacognitive development through the use of multiple opportunities to practice a specific reasoning process.

The impact of metacognitive activities on student attitudes towards experimental physics

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This article by Melissa Eblen-Zayas, Ph.D., shares the implementation of metacognitive activities in an advanced Physics lab. She reports that “the introduction of metacognitive activities in an advanced lab where the laboratory work is not carefully scripted may improve students’ enthusiasm for experimental work and confidence in their ability to be successful in such work.”

Metacognitive Awareness of Learning Strategies in Undergraduates

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This article by Jennifer McCabe presents the results of two studies focusing on metacognitive awareness of learning strategies in undergraduates. The results suggest “that undergraduates are largely unaware of several specific strategies that could benefit memory for course information; further, training in applied learning and memory topics has the potential to improve metacognitive judgments in these domains.

Can Reciprocal Peer Tutoring Increase Metacognition in Your Students?

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Aaron S. Richmond, Ph. D. How many of you use collaborative learning in your classroom? If you do, do you specifically use it to increase metacognition in your students? If the answer is yes, you are likely building on the work of Hadwin, Jarvela, and Miller (2011) and Schraw, Crippen, and Hartley (2006). For those of you unfamiliar with collaborative… Read more »

Metacogntion: Daring Your Students to Take Responsibility for Their Own Successes and Failures.

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In this post, Harrison Fisher encourages all of us to dare our “students to take responsibility for their own learning by using metacognition to monitor their successes and failures.” He offers a variety of strategies to promote metacognition.