Tag Archives: teaching metacognition

Can Reciprocal Peer Tutoring Increase Metacognition in Your Students?

      Comments Off on Can Reciprocal Peer Tutoring Increase Metacognition in Your Students?

Aaron S. Richmond, Ph. D. How many of you use collaborative learning in your classroom? If you do, do you specifically use it to increase metacognition in your students? If the answer is yes, you are likely building on the work of Hadwin, Jarvela, and Miller (2011) and Schraw, Crippen, and Hartley (2006). For those of you unfamiliar with collaborative… Read more »

Metacogntion: Daring Your Students to Take Responsibility for Their Own Successes and Failures.

      Comments Off on Metacogntion: Daring Your Students to Take Responsibility for Their Own Successes and Failures.

In this post, Harrison Fisher encourages all of us to dare our “students to take responsibility for their own learning by using metacognition to monitor their successes and failures.” He offers a variety of strategies to promote metacognition.

Do Your Questions Invite Metacognition?

      Comments Off on Do Your Questions Invite Metacognition?

In this post Arthur Costa and Bena Kallick share question prompts that invite metacognitive responses. They suggest that, “If teachers pose questions that deliberately engage students’ cognitive processing, and let students know why the questions are being posed in this way, it is more likely that students will become aware of and engage their own metacognitive processes.”

The Challenge of Deep Learning in the Age of LearnSmart Course Systems (Part 2)

      Comments Off on The Challenge of Deep Learning in the Age of LearnSmart Course Systems (Part 2)

In this post, Dr. Lauren Scharff follows up on Part I of her reflections on the challenges of deep learning in Age of LearnSmart Course Systems by sharing her actions with her students and some student data and reflections.

The Challenge of Deep Learning in the Age of LearnSmart Course Systems

In this post, Lauren Scharff suggests that some features of e-text learning applications might promote the likelihood that students prioritize “learning efficiently,” resulting in a short-changing of their long-term, deep learning.

The Role of Metacognitive Knowledge in Learning, Teaching, and Assessing

“Metacognitive knowledge is a new category of knowledge in the revised Taxonomy.” According to Pintrich, strategic knowledge, self-knowledge and the knowledge of tasks and their contexts are the three important types of metacognitive knowledge. Paul R. Pintrich (2002) The Role of Metacognitive Knowledge in Learning, Teaching, and Assessing, Theory Into Practice, 41:4, 219-225, DOI: 10.1207/s15430421tip4104_3 The Role of Metacognitive Knowledge… Read more »

Meta-Studying: Teaching Metacognitive Strategies to Enhance Student Success

“Elizabeth Yost Hammer, PhD, of Xavier University of Louisiana, discusses why psychology teachers are uniquely positioned not only to teach the content of psychology but also to teach students how to learn. Hammer presents some strategies to teach metacognitive skills in the classroom to enhance learning and improve study skills and encourages teachers to present students with information about Carol… Read more »

Breaking the Content Mold: The Challenge of Shaping Student Metacognitive Development

Dr. Lauren Scharff shares a personal example to illustrate the challenges in shifting from a focus on content and content-related disciplinary skills to a focus on higher-level thinking and metacognitive skills. She concludes with some suggestions for those desiring to “break the content mold.”

How Do You Increase Your Student’s Metacognition?

Aaron S. Richmond Metropolitan State University of Denver   How many times has a student come to you and said “I just don’t understand why I did so bad on the test?” or “I knew the correct answer but I thought the question was tricky.” or “I’ve read the chapter 5 times and I still don’t understand what you are… Read more »

Metacognition and Scaffolding Student Learning

Dr. Stephen Chew argues that, without metacognitive awareness, attempts at scaffolding may only create overconfidence in students without any learning. He uses the example of exam reviews to support his argument and follows with some ideas he has for intertwining metacognition with scaffolding in order to maximize its benefits.

Supports and Barriers to Students’ Metacognitive Development in a Large Intro Chemistry Course

In this post, Ashley Welsh describes her investigation of students’ metacognitive development in a large introductory organic chemistry course using pre/post metacognitive instrument, a student feedback survey, classroom observations, and student interviews. Her findings offer suggestions for course design and specific reasons why many students might struggle to implement metacognitive strategies.

Habits of Mind

      No Comments on Habits of Mind

by Arthur L. Costa, Ed. D. (Professor Emeritus, California State University, Sacramento). This paper summarizes 16 attributes of what human beings do when they behave intelligently, referred to as Habits of Mind.  Metacognition is the 5th mentioned (see a nice summary of all 16 on the final page). Dr. Costa points out that these “Habits of Mind transcend all subject matters commonly taught in… Read more »

To Test or Not to Test: That is the Metacognitive Question

This post by John Schumacher & Roman Taraban reviews their recent study of the testing effect that indicates that the benefits of retesting depended on student GPA. One hypothesis based on self-reported study strategies is that high GPA students already employ metacognitive approaches, while lower GPA students do not, which is why the teacher-enforced formative testing schedule most helps these lower GPA students.

Executive Function: Can Metacognitive Awareness Training Improve Performance?

by Antonio Gutierrez, Georgia Southern University In a recent meta-analysis of 67 research studies that utilize an intervention targeted at enhancing metacognitive awareness, Jacob and Parkinson (in press) argue that metacognitive interventions aimed at improving executive function processes are not as effective at improving student achievement as once believed by scholars and practitioners alike. In essence, the evidence in support of… Read more »